The crumby dog

Because it’s that week in the lectionary (16th August) here are the pictures I’ve done for the gospel reading about Jesus’ encounter with the canaanites woman.

This one’s called ‘the one with the crumby dog’ (urban version) and features the woman with the sick child who answered back. You go, mamma bear!
The Crumby dog, complete with actual dog
The crumby dog, b/w version
Crumby dog, in/out version

The Way of the Cross

Thanks again to my son for recording and editing this version of the (biblical) stations of the cross. The text is directly from Common Worship, but using only the biblical texts and the prayers. You’re very welcome to use it if it’s helpful to you.

Were you there when they crucified my Lord?

Simple version of the traditional spiritual, with thanks to my son for recording, editing, and mastering the audio, and for producing the video. Please feel free to use it in your digital worship (if you use it on Good Friday you may wish to pause it before the last verse).

Dark is the night

A hymn for Passiontide to Easter Eve 2020, as a contribution to ‘words for difficult times’.
(Tune: Eventide, aka Abide with me)

Here is a video of the hymn, with me singing and my son recording and producing it:

And the text for those using screen readers:

Dark is the night, the passing hours are long,
Lone voices whisper sorrow’s silent song,
Each faltering prayer will fear it’s made in vain,
When will we sing the world to life again?

Dark is the night; not all are blessed with sleep.
Some wake and work, and some must watch and weep:
Angels disguised, they tend a world in pain,
Off’ring the hope that there’ll be life again.

Dark is the night, the silent hours are slow,
Heav’n’s tears anoint the suffering earth below,
Blessing with dew the secret springing grain,
Pledge that the world will soon know life again.

Mothering Sunday – art

Here are some of the paintings I’ve done that might possibly be useful for Mothering Sunday, if you half shut your eyes. Help yourself if you like them.

Mary hugging Jesus after the resurrection when he comes downstairs from seeing the disciples in the upper room.
It’s a hug. It could be the holy family, or the Trinity, or just a hug.
Ruth and Naomi
This one’s called ‘the one with the crumby dog’ and features the woman with the sick child who answered back. You go, mamma bear!
This is Mary and Joseph, just after Joseph wakes up from the dream in which the angel tells him they have to leave everything and run to Egypt.
Another Holy Innocents picture – hiding from the soldiers
If you really look you can see the four women who each played a vital part in saving the baby Moses. But you might not find them because women’s roles in salvation history aren’t always celebrated.
Mary and Elizabeth, both discovering that mothering is best done in solidarity rather than alone.
From my line drawing Stations of the Cross – Mary and John are made into a new family